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The implied undertaking covers documents and information, even if innocuous

Both documentary and oral information obtained on discovery is subject to the implied undertaking:
 
Thus the rule is that both documentary and oral information obtained on discovery … is subject to the implied undertaking. It is not to be used by the other parties except for the purpose of that litigation, unless and until the scope of that undertaking is varied by a court order or other judicial order or a situation of immediate and serious danger emerges.
(Juman v. Doucette, 2008 SCC 8 at para. 4).
 
Similarly:
 
It is a fundamental rule of the litigation model that information, both documentary and oral, obtained by a party through the discovery process is subject to an implied undertaking.
(British Columbia v. Tekavec, 2012 BCSC 1348 at para. 11).
 
The implied undertaking of confidentiality applies even though the information disclosed may not have been confidential or otherwise sensitive to begin with:
 
[The implied undertaking] covers innocuous information that is neither confidential nor discloses any wrongdoing at all.
(Juman v. Doucette, 2008 SCC 8 at para. 5).
 
This book was written by Michael Dew, a Vancouver lawyer who practices civil litigation, including representing claimants in motor vehicle accident claims, persons who have been denied insurance coverage by insurance companies, and persons dealing with builders lien issues.